Ferrari Formula 1 Car by Car: Every Race Car Since...

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Ferrari Formula 1 Car by Car examines every F1 racer Ferrari has campaigned since 1950, each accompanied by exhilarating imagery and technical specifications.

Ferrari has been a top Formula 1 competitor since the series’ inception over 70 years ago. From its first dedicated racer, the 125, through the transition to rear-engine cars to today’s technological powerhouses, Ferrari has never rested on it laurels. The longest running team in F1, Ferrari has a record 16 constructor’s titles. Its cars have been driven by some of the greatest racers of all time, including Michael Schumacher, Gilles Villeneuve, Phil Hill, Niki Lauda, Kimi Raikkonen, Fernando Alonso, and more.

Presented in chronological order, each of Ferrari’s F1 cars is featured with:

  • An exploration of its design and significant features
  • Technical specifications
  • A discussion of its racing record
  • Spectacular full-page images, both historic and contemporary

The book wraps up with a full competition record for all of the cars.
 
Ferrari Formula 1 Car by Car is the complete reference to all of the amazing red racers that have cemented Ferrari’s reputation as the dominant manufacturer in F1 history.


From the Publisher

Ferrari Formula 1 Car by Car: Every Race Car Since 1950

Race Car Posters

Race Car Posters

A race car going around a sharp turn.

A race car going around a sharp turn.

A red race car on a track with a Shell gas station banner behind it.

A red race car on a track with a Shell gas station banner behind it.

Niki Lauda racing a Ferrari in 1974.

Niki Lauda racing a Ferrari in 1974.

INTRODUCTION

Enzo Anselmo Ferrari—and the cars carrying his name—were embedded in the rich tapestry of motor racing history long before 1950, when the postwar Grand Prix racing scene coalesced around what we now call the Formula 1 World Championship. Born in 1898, the second son of a foundry owner, Enzo nursed dreams of becoming a racing driver . . . or a sports journalist, or an opera singer. The death of his father and brother during an outbreak of influenza in 1916 brought the family business to its knees and forced Enzo to set his dreams aside—for a while.

CHAPTER 1 – 1950s

Although it’s easy to look back at 1950 as the genesis of the Formula 1 (F1) World Championship we recognize today as the pinnacle of international motor racing, in the context of the time it was rather less exciting. Motorsport for the most part was about making do: postwar material shortages and economic privation militated against the development of sophisticated new racing cars. Sportscar events were often more popular and offered better prize money.

CHAPTER 2 – 1960s

Politics would cause Ferrari to underperform for much of the 1960s after Enzo ceased to attend races following the death of his son, Dino. Into this vacuum crept those who would exploit Enzo’s absence for their own ends, selectively filtering information back to him as he directed the wider operation from his Maranello office.

CHAPTER 3 – 1970s

The fallow competitive period of the late 1960s called for nothing less than total change. Successive iterations of the original 312 had failed to keep pace with rival developments, chiefly because the V-12 engine—originally built for sportscars—was overweight and overcomplicated in comparison with Ford’s standard-setting V-8. The Cosworth-built DFV, bankrolled by Ford, was Lotus-exclusive in its first year, but from 1968 onward it became the default choice for any team wishing to win Grands Prix—unless that team was committed to building its own engines.

A red car on a race track showing the speed of the vehicle.

A red car on a race track showing the speed of the vehicle.

A person marking the beginning of a race next to a red race car on a track.

A person marking the beginning of a race next to a red race car on a track.

A red race car on a track branded with Marlboro and Shell logos.

A red race car on a track branded with Marlboro and Shell logos.

Two race cars skidding into each other.

Two race cars skidding into each other.

CHAPTER 4 – 1980s

In the era of the Space Shuttle, the video recorder, and the mobile telephone, Ferrari embraced modernity in a rush. The team became the last to adopt monocoque chassis design, nearly twenty years after Lotus made the philosophy essential, and did so in step with the widespread adoption of carbon fiber. Believed to be an unsafe voodoo substance at first, this composite material became de rigueur within two seasons of McLaren introducing it in 1981.

CHAPTER 5 – 1990s

Optimism bookended Ferrari’s decade, but between those competitive flourishes lay a wasteland of failure. Politics undermined virtually every effort to bring the Formula 1 project forward, but the underlying problems ran deeper than that. Ferrari’s very philosophy was flawed: the company was grasping for magic-bullet solutions and then flying into a panic when new approaches failed to deliver race wins right away.

CHAPTER 6 – 2000s

At the turn of the decade, Jean Todt’s Ferrari matured into a fighting unit that achieved dominance in all areas of Formula 1. In Michael Schumacher they had the best driver of his generation, and under Ross Brawn’s leadership the technical team delivered class-leading cars year after year. Crucially, Brawn’s pit wall operation was the sharpest in motor racing, consistently outfoxing their rivals even when Ferrari looked vulnerable.

CHAPTER 7 – 2010s

After the breakup of the team that had generated so much success in the 1990s—Michael Schumacher and Rory Byrne into retirement, Jean Todt into politics as president of the FIA, Ross Brawn into a team leader in his own right—Ferrari slid back into old bad habits. Management began to wilt under the onslaught from above and from the Italian media, and relations between the different departments in Maranello soured in a morass of backstabbing.

Mike Hawthorn racing in the 1954 Belgian Grand Prix.

Mike Hawthorn racing in the 1954 Belgian Grand Prix.

Jody Scheckter (pictured) racing on a track.

Jody Scheckter (pictured) racing on a track.

A pit crew working on the engine of a red race car.

A pit crew working on the engine of a red race car.

500/625 F1

In the early months of 1952, Formula 1’s very future as a category was thrown into doubt. The Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA) announced a new formula, based on 2.5-liter naturally aspirated or 750 cc blown engines, due to come in to effect in 1954. While that would theoretically give manufacturers adequate time to develop new cars and engines, it presented an immediate cascade of problems: Alfa Romeo had reached the development limit of their car and couldn’t afford to create a new one, so they withdrew; no other extant manufacturers had the machinery to challenge Ferrari; and there was little sign of the much-vaunted British Racing Motors (BRM) team. When BRM pulled out of the high-profile non-championship Turin Grand Prix in April 1952, race organizers across Europe fell in line with the promoters of the French Grand Prix, who had already said they would only welcome Formula 2 entries.

312T T2/T3/T4/T5

Although his personal relationship with Enzo Ferrari had been terminally damaged by his temporary exile to the special projects department, Mauro Forghieri remained industrious through 1974 as he juggled ongoing refinements of the 312B3 with work on a new car for ’75. Convinced that the B3’s development potential was spent, Forghieri pursued a very different concept—much to the bafflement and chagrin of Niki Lauda, who wondered why Ferrari would junk a well-known philosophy for an unproven one. But once Lauda was on board with the notion, and had lent his considerable development expertise to it, the new car would mature into a championship winner.

412T2

During the final months of the 1994 season, Paolo Martinelli was appointed as head of the engine department in place of Claudio Lombardi, and one of his first acts was to begin a research project into future engine architectures. By now Ferrari was the only team to persist with V-12 engines, this being seen as a key pillar of the brand. But Williams had dominated the world championship in recent years with a Renault V10, and Michael Schumacher claimed the 1994 drivers’ title (albeit narrowly) with a Ford V-8 ahead of his Benetton team switching to Renault power in 1995. There was also an FIA-mandated reduction in engine size to 3 liters looming.

Publisher‏:‎Motorbooks (May 25, 2021)
Language‏:‎English
Hardcover‏:‎224 pages
ISBN-10‏:‎0760367779
ISBN-13‏:‎978-0760367773
Item Weight‏:‎3.95 pounds
Dimensions‏:‎10 x 0.88 x 12.25 inches

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